Post-Nasal Drip

Also, along with the acid there is a thing called pepsin which refluxes up. Pepsin is a digestive enzyme that is produced in the stomach and is used to break down proteins in the stomach.

They are emptied from the empty stomach quickly, in less than an hour, and the acid then re-accumulates. The best way to take antacids, therefore, is approximately one hour after meals, which is just before the symptoms of reflux begin after a meal. Since the food from meals slows the emptying from the stomach, an antacid taken after a meal stays in the stomach longer and is effective longer. For the same reason, a second dose of antacids approximately two hours after a meal takes advantage of the continuing post-meal slower emptying of the stomach and replenishes the acid-neutralizing capacity within the stomach.

A Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) is a condition in which the oesophagus (the tube leading to the stomach) becomes irritated or inflamed because of acid backing up from the stomach, causing the burning sensation of heartburn (so called because the oesophagus lies just behind the heart). A Reflux of stomach contents back up the gullet is a very common problem and many of the symptoms this causes, like heartburn, are due to stomach acid. There is also a small chance of developing cancer in the esophagus or throat due to long-term acid reflux.

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The condition develops when the stomach acid travels back through the food pipe and reaches the back of the throat. National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Acid Reflux in (GER and GERD) in Children and Teens, April 2015. GERD and pyloric stenosis If your baby projectile vomits in the first few weeks of life, keep an eye out for symptoms of pyloric stenosis, since it can sometimes be confused with GERD in infants. In addition to forceful vomiting at feedings, symptoms of pyloric stenosis include blood in the vomit, constant hunger, dehydration and constipation.

When pepsin enters the throat and the airways it will only further irritate and inflame them. Sometimes small pieces of food or drops of liquid are inhaled into your lungs, where they can introduce bacteria.

Heartburn: Foods to Eat, Foods to Avoid

  • There are problems with using pH testing for diagnosing GERD.
  • Pepsin in the wrong place for any period of time can become reactivated should the pH drop to less than 8, which occurs in almost everybody given a 24-hour time window.
  • PPIs are used when H2 antagonists do not relieve symptoms adequately or when complications of GERD such as erosions or ulcers, strictures, or Barrett’s esophagus exist.
  • That is to say, the acid can travel all the way up to your nose and sinuses (for instance, while you are lying down asleep), and this acid can inflame the nose and sinus linings.
  • Secondly I would also recommend my article on LPR symptoms where I talk about the symptoms of silent reflux in detail which could be potentially effecting you.

This can cause heartburn and tissue damage, among other symptoms. Smoking and obesity increase a person’s risk of GERD. It is treatable with medication, but some people may need surgery.

The probe measures the acid level in the throat over a 24-hour period and can confirm the presence of abnormal acid levels. Treatment for LPR may include limiting acidic foods, caffeine, alcohol and carbonated beverages.

If reflux did occur at the same time as the symptoms, then reflux is likely to be the cause of the symptoms. If there was no reflux at the time of symptoms, then reflux is unlikely to be the cause of the symptoms. Esophageal acid testing is considered a “gold standard” for diagnosing GERD. As discussed previously, the reflux of acid is common in the general population.

In both of these situations, the pH test can be very useful. If testing reveals substantial reflux of acid while medication is continued, then the treatment is ineffective and will need to be changed. If testing reveals good acid suppression with minimal reflux of acid, the diagnosis of GERD is likely to be wrong and other causes for the symptoms need to be sought. There are problems with using pH testing for diagnosing GERD. Despite the fact that normal individuals and patients with GERD can be separated fairly well on the basis of pH studies, the separation is not perfect.

Moreover, the amounts and/or numbers of drugs that are required for satisfactory treatment are sometimes so great that drug treatment is unreasonable. In such situations, surgery can effectively stop reflux.

It is possible therefore, that the acid is stimulating the pain nerves within the esophageal wall just beneath the lining. Although this may be the case, a second explanation is supported by the work of one group of scientists. These scientists find that heartburn provoked by acid in the esophagus is associated with contraction of the muscle in the lower esophagus.

acid reflux cause congestion

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