How Much Ibuprofen is Too Much?

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) effectively reduce inflammation (swelling) and relieve pain. Inflammation is the body’s way of protecting itself after irritation or an injury.

Holiday Drinking: How 8 Common Medications Interact with Alcohol

Commonly used NSAIDs include acetylsalicylic acid (the drug in medicines like Aspirin), ibuprofen, diclofenac and naproxen. Did you know Ibuprofen can cause acid reflux? Stunned?

The most common risk factor for esophagitis, GERD causes acid and partially digested food to flow from the stomach back up the esophagus, irritating the lining. It’s important to treat heartburn, especially if you experience frequent symptoms.

Use of any drug always carries some risk – even medications can produce unwanted side effects. It’s important to be careful when taking any type of drug. Gerard Isenberg, MD is a gastroenterologist and associate chief and director, Clinical Operations, Division of Gastroenterology and Liver Disease, and chief medical quality officer, University Hospitals Digestive Health Institute, at University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center. You can request an appointment with Dr. Isenberg or any other medical provider online. Ask your physician whether ibuprofen or another NSAID best treats your symptoms and has the fewest potential side effects.

However, some people have a lot of reflux without developing oesophagitis or symptoms. Visit our Acid Reflux / GERD category page for the latest news on this subject, or sign up to our newsletter to receive the latest updates on Acid Reflux / GERD. There is a range of measures people can put in place to prevent and treat the symptoms of heartburn.

surgery to prevent infection and reduce scarring. Consider taking something to reduce acid when taking ibuprofen. Check with your doctor and/or pharmacist to make sure you’re not on other medications that can increase your chance for side effects. The holidays can be challenging for people with GERD because there’s often so much tempting food and alcohol. “It’s hard to tell whether it’s eating or drinking that is causing reflux symptoms to flare up,” Elder said.

Food and Drug Administration. COX-2 Selective (includes Bextra, Celebrex, and Vioxx) and Non-Selective Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs). If you do start an NSAID routine, think small. For instance, a single baby aspirin (about 80 milligrams) every day can give you strong protection against heart disease with relatively few side effects. Whatever your reason for taking an NSAID, your doctor can help you find the lowest effective dose.

Gastroesophageal reflux – discharge

If it were discovered today, doctors would hail it as a medical breakthrough. There is a circular band of muscle (a sphincter) at the junction between the oesophagus and stomach. This relaxes to allow food down but then normally tightens up and stops food and acid leaking up (refluxing) into the oesophagus. In effect, the sphincter acts like a valve.

How will my healthcare provider choose an NSAID that is right for me?

can ibuprofen cause gerd

On rare occasions, NSAIDs such as ibuprofen can cause mild stomach-related side effects such as indigestion, heartburn, nausea, loss of appetite, stomach pain, and diarrhoea. More serious side effects include ulcers, bleeding or tears in the stomach or intestine, but these are usually linked to taking NSAIDs at high doses (over 1200mg/day) for long periods of time (more than 3 days at a time).

Leave a Reply