Heartburn and indigestion

It then moves upward to the neck and throat. Officially, heartburn is known as gastroesophageal reflux, when acidic stomach juices or food and fluids back up into the esophagus. This is a hollow muscular tube between your mouth and your stomach. Avoid other heartburn medications during pregnancy unless they’re prescribed by your doctor. However, if your heartburn is persistent, your doctor may suggest that you try an over-the-counter heartburn medicine that controls acid production, like proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) or H2 blockers.

However, it may be best to avoid magnesium during the last trimester of pregnancy. Magnesium could interfere with contractions during labor.

While it is considered a normal part of a healthy pregnancy, symptoms may be frequent and distressing to women. Reflux (heartburn) is a common symptom in pregnancy.

Acid reflux occurs when some acid leaks up (refluxes) into the gullet (oesophagus). The lining of the oesophagus can cope with a certain amount of acid. However, if more than the usual amount of acid refluxes, it may cause some inflammation on the lining of the oesophagus, which can cause symptoms. When we eat, food passes down the gullet (oesophagus) into the stomach.

When women do experience pregnancy symptoms they may include symptoms include missed menstrual period, mood changes, headaches, lower back pain, fatigue, nausea, breast tenderness, and heartburn. Signs and symptoms in late pregnancy include leg swelling and shortness of breath. Options for relief of pregnancy symptoms include exercise, diet, and other lifestyle changes.

Home pregnancy test kits are available without a prescription at pharmacies and most grocery stores. Contact a doctor or other health care professional if you think you may be pregnant. Hypothyroidism During PregnancyHypothyroidism during pregnancy can be treated with synthetic thyroid hormones to maintain the proper thyroid hormone balance. Hypothyroidism symptoms include fatigue, weight gain, lethargy, and constipation.

“But a woman’s level of suffering is really important to take into consideration. Maternal suffering is not good for baby either.” The research shows that if you’re taking a PPI for your acid reflux once a day so you can sleep, the potential for harm is very low. If your symptoms do not improve after the above recommended diet and lifestyle changes are in place, talk with your healthcare provider about over-the-counter medicines.

In most cases, acid reflux is easily treated, even in pregnancy. If there are symptoms that don’t respond well to treatment, that can result in complications such as gastrointestinal bleeding, difficulty swallowing, or weight loss. If this happens your midwife or obstetrician may refer you to a gastroenterologist. Also be aware that other conditions such as gallbladder disease, pancreatitis, or even cancers of the esophagus and stomach can mimic gastroesophageal reflux disease, although these are far less common.

  • Chances are good that you’re one of many pregnant women who experience the churning and burning of heartburn or acid indigestion.
  • Up to eight out of 10 mums-to-be suffer from heartburn and indigestion during pregnancy, particularly in the second and third trimesters (CKS 2017, NHS 2014) .
  • partially digested by stomach acid and enzymes.

They’re generally considered safe during pregnancy for women whose symptoms are severe and don’t respond to antacids and other lifestyle changes, but you’ll want to get the okay first from your practitioner. More than half of all pregnant women report symptoms of severe heartburn, particularly during their second and third trimesters. Heartburn, also called acid indigestion, is an irritation or burning sensation of the esophagus caused by stomach contents that reflux (comes back up) from the stomach. Proton pump inhibitors should be reserved for pregnant patients with more severe heartburn symptoms and those not responding to antacids and lifestyle and dietary changes. Lansoprazole (Prevacid®) is the preferred PPI because of case reports of safety in pregnant women.

acid reflux at night early pregnancy

When you lie down, it makes it easier for stomach contents to rise up and cause you grief. Eating late at night will mean little time for your body to digest what’s in there before you try and get some rest. If you do get hungry before bed, try to eat something small and plain as a snack. ‘Keep a note of foods that trigger heartburn and try to avoid them,’ says Dr O’Connor.

Some treatments may be unsafe for you and your unborn baby, or can cause tummy upsets, or circulation and breathing problems (NICE 2017) . An increase in the hormone progesterone relaxes the smooth muscles of your womb (uterus) to make way for your growing baby. This hormone can also relax the valve that separates your food pipe from your stomach (Bianco 2017, NICE 2017) . This allows gastric acids to seep up out of your stomach, causing a burning sensation. It’s very likely.

Changes in levels of estrogen and progesterone result in a decrease in pressure on a part of your body called the lower esophageal sphincter, thereby increasing acid reflux. Additionally, the growing baby causes an increase in what is called intra-abdominal pressure, resulting in an increase in the development of reflux. Excess pregnancy weight gain can also make the problem worse, particularly in the third trimester. As well as avoiding common dietary triggers, Ross recommends eating several small meals a day instead of three large ones and taking your time when eating. Try not to wash down your food with too much liquid, which can increase the risk of acid reflux.

This can also result in food and acid being pushed back up into your esophagus. The first question you may have is how to make it stop. You may also wonder if treatments are safe for your baby. Learn what causes heartburn during pregnancy and what you can do about it. It’s called heartburn, although that burning feeling in your chest has nothing to do with the heart.

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