Acid Reflux and Stomach Bloating

I don’t know what to do or who to believe. Our doctors here in Africa don’t have much experience in diagnosing these problems.

Then the attacks started. With a sore tummy, painful to eat or drink, and constant heartburn, I had gone back to the doctor several times. He told me I had a virus. Finally, I told him I feel silly about complaining, but I have constant headaches, stomach aches, a hard time eating and drinking, and a lack of general energy.

More about Heartburn and GERD

The surgeon described it as a grade one (the lowest of 4 grades, I believe). Nevertheless, he has instructed me to double up on the PPI at least until he schedules a repeat endoscopy in 6 months (and I strongly suspect he will then recommend my staying on that regimen for life.) He claims that many my age (77) are on this dosage of a proton pump inhibitor for the long term without ill effect, and he says my complete lack of symptoms is due to the fact that my reflux does not reach high enough for me to be aware of it. Still, I am very apprehensive about this high dosage every day, although after a week on this increased dosage I have experienced only slight, intermittent stomach pain but more frequent nighttime bloating and gas. I have read that this high dosage, at my age, can make one more susceptible to fractures (blocks absorption of calcium?) and I am an active skier. I wish I could get some independent advice on this.

Many people have heartburn every now and again after eating a large meal, and will be familiar with the unpleasant burning feeling in their chest, just behind their breastbone. Occasional acid reflux is normal too. Up to 20 out of 100 people living in Western countries regularly have problems like heartburn or regurgitation. Although both of these can be unpleasant, they don’t usually lead to other health problems. But if you have very frequent or severe heartburn and often have acid reflux, you may have what is known as “gastro-esophageal reflux disease,” or GERD for short.

Possible triggers include eating large and late meals, caffeine, alcohol, fatty meals, NSAIDs [non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen] and other medications.” Exercise, relaxation techniques, psychological therapies and acupuncture may help, but evidence is hard to come by because it hasn’t been a research priority, says Ford. Special diets, such as ones low in short-chain carbohydrate Fodmaps (fermentable, oligo-, di-, mono-saccharides and polyols) that can help people with irritable bowel syndrome, need further research to see whether they will help those with dyspepsia.

Any advice is welcome. Email me please. Thanks. Tina from Ontario Canada. Robert an alternative model for you to consider which I came across recently and sounds convincing.

Good luck to all of you who are still struggling. I hate the fact that I can’t have coffee, tomatoes, spicy food or a glass of wine every now and then. I am very health conscious and follow mostly a vegetarian diet with the occasional “fish” treat but the fact that I have food restrictions doesn’t sit well with me, especially if we’re talking about foods such as tomatoes and citrus fruits which are so delicious and good for you. I know that I should not be eating late at night and should only have small meals but I’m human and sometimes I crave these foods and want to have them but boy, do I suffer the consequences! Last night for instance I had some bean chili with mixed greens and a touch of yogurt and that was it.

IBS triggers

A week ago I started apple cider vinegar before every meal, but this is bringing back the lump in throat and it is starting to make me nauseous. I have also had problems with alternating diarrhea and constipation for a long time and doctor put me on Align probiotics, but this made me very nauseous too and I stopped.

Food travels from your mouth to the stomach through your esophagus. GERD can irritate the food pipe and cause heartburn and other symptoms. “My symptoms are triggered by a combination of stress and food,” Sikora said. “Food is the main culprit.

One of these is bacterial overgrowth in the stomach or upper small intestine. Lower acid levels would contribute to this by allowing these bacteria to live in the stomach or upper intestine. There also could be a slowing of the speed of digestion, affording the bacteria longer access to the food. If you’ve answered yes to any of those questions, it’s likely that you are suffering from low stomach acid levels.

so another explanation for your symptoms is much the most likely. Gastritis (inflammation of the stomach) and acid reflux are common conditions which you can read about on the NHS website at this link and here.

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