3 Simple Steps to Eliminate Heartburn and Acid Reflux

Gastritis is a widespread condition where the lining of the stomach becomes inflamed. Gastritis can be chronic, even lasting a lifetime.

Read about risk factors, including diet and lifestyle, and the many home remedies people can try. In the worst cases, acid reflux may lead to GERD or gastroesophogeal reflux disease or worse conditions. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is the long-term, regular occurrence of acid reflux.

This causes symptoms of GORD, which can include heartburn and acid reflux. Acid reflux is an uncomfortable condition in which stomach acid flows back into the food pipe.

Stress contributes to reflux. Clearly, food is supposed to go down, not up, when you eat. That’s why there are two main valves, or sphincters, that control food going in and out of your stomach — the one at the top (or the lower esophageal sphincter) and one at the bottom (the pyloric valve).

What does heartburn look like?

If these steps aren’t effective or if you have severe pain or difficulty swallowing, see your doctor to rule out other causes. You may also need medication to control reflux even as you pursue lifestyle changes. When you’re standing, or even sitting, gravity alone helps keeps acid in the stomach, where it belongs.

Diet Changes for GERD

According to estimates from the American College of Gastroenterology, at least 15 million Americans experience heartburn every day. Learn more about stomach fluid, the sphincter between the esophagus and stomach, and how reflux can be harmful. Your doctor will ask about your symptoms and do an exam. It can be helpful to keep a journal to note what you eat and drink and when you have heartburn. This will help you and your doctor pinpoint your triggers.

A couple caveats

Over time, you will be able to correlate the offending foods with heartburn events. Print this and take this with you to your next doctor’s appointment to discuss possible causes of heartburn you may be experiencing. The esophagus (the tube that connects your mouth to the stomach) has a tight band of muscles at the lower end (lower esophageal sphincter [LES]) that closes after the food enters the stomach and prevents the stomach contents to reenter the esophagus. If this sphincter weakens or relaxes at the wrong time, stomach acid can back up into the esophagus, causing heartburn and its complications.

It’s believed that it might help increase the mucous coating of your esophageal lining, which may protect your esophagus from damage caused by stomach acid. The results show that medical and surgical treatments do prevent cancer of the oesophagus. However, the first author of the study, John Maret-Ouda, said the findings don’t automatically mean that more people should be treated preventatively. Maret-Ouda is a medical doctor and researcher at Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm, Sweden.

cure heartburn and acid reflux

Leave a Reply